A Victorian Behind

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One thing you can always count on about Melbourne weather: You will find it inconvenient. This was the rainy but then sunny and then cold day at the Victorian Hot Rod Show this year. No problemo inside the exhibition building – but a nuisance outside where the free show goes on. My camera gear is not waterproof and I have to be careful that it doesn’t get a dose of Melbourne.

Well we survived, and I was delighted to see this ’34 in one of the dry periods – at least it was dry on the top – down by the roadway it was still wet. I couldn’t resist trying to see what was under the pan, however, and was assisted by the new camera I carried. The Fujifilm X series is my chosen set of instruments, and this year I had an X-T10 with a zoom lens to use. A speedlight flash also added light under there, though the Fujifilm speedlight is a cumbersome affair that stands up very tall. I am hoping the new Metz M400 is ready by the time I make my next journey east – it is only about half the height of the Fujifilm Ef-42.

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Anyway, have a look at the finish on the front and back decks of the ’34. I must say I have often puzzled at the inclusion of louvres on the back deck of a car that was not intended for runs on salt flats at high speed. perhaps there is an additional radiator and fans inside there to cool the engine…I do like the retention of the full bonnet side panels, though, as they make the whole design look art deco.

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Under the back was the classic quick-change rear end, leaf springs, and shocks as well as the trailing arms –¬†which is a lot nicer to see than strange clips and parallel arms sawed off modern cars and welded on. I know there are some exciting adaptations done on some cars but if you are going to have a design that is as open as this it is good to see traditional rigging.

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Is your underside as clean as this? Have you checked lately? No good having a sticky bottom if you are going to go out and meet people…

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